February 18, 2017

So, you’ve decided to enter a white collar charity boxing event. You fancy yourself as the next Mike Tyson?

Well hold your horses sonny Jim. Before you start biting ears off and throwing haymakers, let’s take a minute to talk about this…

If you’ve already registered, you’ll know that there’s an eight-week training programme, and at the end of it you’ll enter the ring against someone of a similar ability.

The training will teach you the basics of movement, defence and attack. You’ll learn the basic punches – jab, cross and hook and how to mix these into simple combinations.

The jab is the most basic boxing punch and is used to break open your opponent's guard. UWCB

Jab

The cross is thrown in response to an attack and is used as a counter, to take advantage of your opponent's open guard

Cross

The hook is thrown around the outside of yuor opponent's guard and is a great combination finisher.

Hook

The uppercut is thrown below your opponent's chin. Exploding upwards through the weakest point in your opponent's guard

Uppercut

So, if you and your opponent are evenly matched, you’ve both had the same training and you both know the same basic skills – what will separate you? What’s the crucial factor that will make sure you are crowned the winner?

Fitness.

At this level, it is all about fitness. It doesn’t matter if the other guy/gal knows a fancy combo, or how to execute the perfect rope-a-dope, or shoulder roll. If they aren’t fit enough, they won’t beat you.

When a boxer gets tired, the first thing to fail is their defence. They let their guard down, and that’s when the fitter, more switched-on, fighter (you!) will take advantage.

The ability to go all-out for three two-minute rounds is harder than it sounds. So, whilst the training camp will be your ‘bread and butter’, if you want to come out on top, you need to put the work in on your own.

The fight is won or lost far away from witnesses - behind the lines, in the gym, and out there on the road, long before I dance under those lights.

- Muhammad Ali

The Extra Mile

So, in addition to the official training camp, aim for two extra sessions in the gym each week.

To go hard for three rounds, we predominantly want short, intense workouts. That’s why we’ll be done in 35 minutes, maximum!

We’re also going to adopt the KISS principle – Keep It Simple Stupid. There are all sorts of complex programmes you could choose. But for our purposes let’s stick to a simple session split into two parts:

  1. strength
  2. conditioning

Strength

Maybe you already have a strength routine that you enjoy? Great – go for it. Just stick to these principles:

  • Keep the reps high, and the weights fairly low
  • Stick to compound movements, not isolations like bicep and hamstring curls
  • Include legs, upper body pull, and upper body push movements
  • Include a core element.
  • Stick to 20 minutes max.

You shouldn’t be lifting really heavy weights, or trying to smash a deadlift PB. This is about building muscular strength-endurance for boxing.

Here’s an example bodyweight routine that would be great for a beginner:

Complete 4-5 rounds

Body weight squats

20

Push-ups

15

Pull-ups

6

Plank

20 seconds hold


As you progress you could add weight to the squats and pull-ups, do incline push-ups, and try Core Sliding. Just remember to keep the reps high.

Conditioning

Now we need to make sure you’re in shape to out box your opponent for three two-minute rounds!

We’re going to simulate time rounds of the fight, with an increasing work:rest ratio. Then over the next 6 weeks you’ll work a bit longer at each session. We’re going to throw in an extra round each time – this way you’ll have an extra round ‘in the tank’.

We’ll start by working hard for 45 seconds, and resting for one minute. I don’t mean all out for 45 seconds, I mean hard: 7-8/10. In a fight you’ll go through moments of all-out effort, and periods where you back off a bit. It’s not realistic to expect you to work all-out for 45 seconds in week 1.

Week

Work

Rest

Rounds

1

45

60

4

2

60

60

4

3

75

60

4

4

90

60

4

5

105

60

4

6

120

60

4

7

120

45

4


In six or seven weeks’ time you’ll be working all out for 2 minutes, and resting for one minute – just like the fight.

Which exercises should you choose?

Anything that gets your heart rate up! You can mix it up each round. Here are some ideas:

Burpees

Heavy bag punches

Tuck jumps

High knees skipping sprints

Boxing pads with a partner

Jumping jacks

Squat thrusts

Squats

Box jumps

Mountain climbers with core sliders

Double unders

Reverse lunges with core sliders


So should you end up doing two minutes of straight burpees by week seven? Well you could but that’s a bit dull.

A better approach would be to create a circuit, and complete as many circuits as possible during each of the 4 timed rounds. For example:

  • 10 heavy bag punches
  • 10 burpees
  • 10 double unders
  • 10 mountain climbers

Each session, change the exercises!

Ben Jones and the other boxers at Assassin Promotions use the Beast Rope for their skipping workoutsWe especially love skipping. Skipping has the added bonus of improving your coordination, speed, footwork and agility – all vital attributes for a boxer.

You can check out our Beast Rope here.

Another of our favourites is Core Sliding. Core Sliding is extremely versatile – slow controlled movements are great for core strength training, whilst you can perform fast, intense movements for conditioning. Here’s coach Jade Fadlen performing a full body circuit with our Core Sliders:

 


Special Discount

White Collar Boxers can get 10% any of our kit, including the Beast Rope and the Core Sliders. Just pop your email address in here and we’ll send you a discount code:

So get out there, train like a BEAST  and fulfil your dreams in the ring. Remember:
REACH YOUR GOALS. BEAST YOUR GOALS.


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